Movement

Strength and Conditioning in the Rehabilitation Setting

When you think Physical Therapy, what do you think?  If you imagine it is a place where you get a massage, do the same exercises as everyone else (on a table) for an hour, or simply a place where you are told what you cannot do/should stop doing, you are thinking of an older model of care.  

It seems more and more that the gap between the rehabilitative field and the strength and conditioning field is becoming narrower by the day, and for good reason.  Rehab IS strength and conditioning, just on the opposite side of the continuum.  

 This graph does an excellent job demonstrating the idea of a TEAM approach to a patient's care.  Worth noting is just how long we as healthcare professionals and strength and conditioning specialists can have in the rehabilitation of the strength and conditioning athlete. 

This graph does an excellent job demonstrating the idea of a TEAM approach to a patient's care.  Worth noting is just how long we as healthcare professionals and strength and conditioning specialists can have in the rehabilitation of the strength and conditioning athlete. 

When tissue gets injured it is our job to influence the healing process while maintaining progressive overload to create resiliency.  Better known as the act of accepting the demands of weight training, running and sports without being re-injured or suffering set backs.  In order to do this we must use the appropriate load, intensity and volume that challenges the injured tissue without irritating their symptoms.  

  • LOAD >> CAPACITY = INJURY
  • LOAD = CAPACITY = REHAB
  • LOAD << CAPACITY = PREVENTION

This sounds a lot like what I used to do as a strength and conditioning coach.  Create an exercise program that uses the appropriate loads, intensities and volumes that will help create positive adaptations without hurting my clients.  

The goal of rehab after all is to get the person in front of us back to their prior level of function. This can be anything from being a desk jockey to the All-American Jockey. 

When healthcare professionals do not understand strength and conditioning protocols, it will be hard to help that patient to continue to train around injury.

This is an e-mail that I received this morning from a trainer that I work closely with:

"Hey Joe. I have a question.  I have a client that is seeing a PT for some shoulder issues.  The client introduced us through email so we could work together to figure out an alternate plan of training that would allow her to get the treatment she needs for her shoulder while continuing her training. The PT responded that he wants the client to abstain from any and all exercise, like do nothing at all."

No one should ever have to hear that have to abstain from all exercise unless it is 100% warranted.  If I person can go into the gym and perform pain free movements, they should, not just to keep their body some-what conditioned, but to help keep them sane.  There are plenty of activities one can perform while still "protecting" healing tissues.  

This is where a healthcare professional who also has experience as a strength coach can really help.  It becomes very easy to understand regressions and lateralizations of exercises that will allow them to still have some training effect while recovering from their injury.

For these reasons, it becomes highly important for rehabilitation providers to understand performance, and on the flip side strength coaches and trainers to understand more of the rehabilitation world.  This will allow for better communication, and make for a much better transition from being hurt to getting back to your previous self. 

It is okay to not know everything, actually it is perfectly normal.  However, identifying areas of opportunity in our practice and linking them with patient's needs should force us to build a reliable network of providers in order to ensure that each and every patient receives optimal care and has the greatest chance for success.  

 

 

 

Controlled Articular Rotations (CARs)

Controlled Articular Rotations (CARs)

Come learn about the many uses of Controlled Articular Rotations as we take you through the 4 most common applications to fit into your life or any level of fitness/performance you find yourself in. 

Re-Thinking Stretching

When it comes to mobility work and stretching, your goals should dictate what you do. These goals direct your prescription of the type of mobility work and how long you should hold your stretches for.

Are You Actually Stretching Your Hamstrings?

Are You Actually Stretching Your Hamstrings?

Joe Gambino, PT, DPT, CSCS discusses how typical hamstring stretches may not target what we intend it to. 

Course Review: Kinstretch

Course Review: Kinstretch

In our latest blog post, Joe Gambino writes a course review of Kinstretch and how it can help you. 

Home Exercise Programs and Patient (Self) Trust

Home Exercise Programs and Patient (Self) Trust

Trust is the one thing that changes everything.  In our latest blog Joe LaVacca offers his view on how this important concept relates to patients as it pertains to compliance with a Home Exercise Program.

The Best Exercise You Are (Probably) Not Doing

The Best Exercise You Are (Probably) Not Doing

Joe Gambino PT, DPT, CSCS discusses one of his favorite core strengthening exercises that he utilizes during his training and treatment sessions with clients - The Kettlebell Pull Over.  

Keep Rolling, Rolling, Rolling

Keep Rolling, Rolling, Rolling

In this week's blog Joe LaVacca discusses the potential pitfall that all healthcare professionals have made at one point or another by using a very popular movement assessment and treatment as an example.  

Dry Needling versus Manual Therapy

Dry Needling versus Manual Therapy

This week's blog focuses on the growing debate and popularity of Trigger Point Dry Needling and how it compares to manual therapy as shown in the most recent research.  Co-written by Joe LaVacca and Taylor Huang, SPT.

Sticking it to Pain: How to Use Kinesiology Taping

Sticking it to Pain: How to Use Kinesiology Taping

In this blog, Joe LaVacca discusses his views on Kinesiology Taping through his experiences as a teacher and in the clinic over the past few years.  He discusses why he uses tape, what he believes the tape actually does, and how it can be useful in the rehabilitation of patients, as long as we have realistic expectations on its benefits.  

Connecting the Dots: Understanding Tensegrity & Mechanotransduction

Connecting the Dots: Understanding Tensegrity & Mechanotransduction

How does tissue heal?  How does everything connect to everything?  Does it matter for healthcare professionals and patients alike to have a better understanding of these principles?  In our next blog with pose these questions and more as we discuss tensegrity and how it relates to human biology.

Functional Range Release: Course Review

Functional Range Release:  Course Review

The Functional Anatomy Seminars consist of 3 systems covering all aspects of musculoskeletal care and optimization.In addition to being both the creator and head instructor of Functional Anatomic Palpation Systems (F.A.P.™), Functional Range Release (F.R.®) Techniques, and Functional Range Conditioning (FRC)™, Dr. Andreo Spina has also authored chapters in various sports medicine textbooks, is a published researcher, and internationally renowned speaker on the topics of manual therapy, soft tissue assessment and treatment, mobility/flexibility training, and physical conditioning.  We had the opportunity to take FRR of the Upper Limb this Winter and enjoyed it thoroughly.